Making history in the air

#Team Freedom

Max Parrot - Landing the ultimate jump

I’m always working to push my limits and do something that’s never been done before in competition. Every trick is different – some I get right away, others take 20-30 hours of practice but I always get excited to master something that has never been done before.

The most challenging aspect of learning a new trick is to think of something that has never been done before. It’s a lot easier to mimic a trick that I can see a ton of other boarders doing. But when it comes to creating something completely new, the learning curve is a lot steeper and there’s a ton of wiping out. It's scary in a way to have this feeling but amazing at the same time!

Ideas come to me in a flash and at any moment. Whether I’m driving or eating breakfast, the idea just hits me and I try to visualize the new trick and think of how I could make it possible.

To physically prepare, I do a lot of trampoline exercises. The trampoline is a safe place to try new tricks without putting yourself at risk for injuries. I don’t do any crazy workouts; however, I do a ton of stretching. Every night before bed, I stretch for 20 minutes; it’s a good way to prevent injuries. I changed my routine this year to incorporate more trampoline work to perfect my technique. It's not always about having the strongest muscles; it’s just as important to practice flexibility exercises.

A huge part of this is also my mental game. I have a sports psychologist as a member of my team that helps me to be strong, focused and willing to challenge my comfort zone. This helped a ton when I landed the first ever double backside rodeo 1440 in X Games competition back in 2016. Rodeos are one of the most difficult and rare spins, but luckily, I was super calm about doing it in competition.

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